When You Wish Upon a Star

Never underestimate the will of the human spirit and one’s desire for work. Many have daunting obstacles such as lack of family or emotional support, a safe home, problems with substance abuse, language barriers, or physical challenges such as being hearing impaired. The Power of Work Luncheon showcased remarkable individuals in our community.  For despite the hurdles they faced, each one was there to recognize the major role Goodwill played in helping them find their direction.

Goodwill shone brightly on Thursday, April 18, when four appreciate individuals told the community their story. Each wore a smile of gratitude for Goodwill and the professionals whose job it is to be there for those in need: job, education, home, clothes, mentors.

The power of Goodwill’s transformative community programs help make dreams a reality for thousands of people.

The Goodwill Power of Work Luncheon has been described by attendees as “the most enjoyable and inspirational business luncheon in Denver.” Hundreds of corporate and community leaders find inspiration every year in the stories of courageous individuals in Goodwill’s career development programs and their perseverance on the path to success. The tie that binds all honorees is the fact that WORK (an opportunity, a job, a meaningful career) was the force that led them in the right direction.

In addition to the special awards honorees, Goodwill honored pro linebacker Wesley Woodyard for his service to Colorado through his 16Ways Foundation, and volunteer work with at-risk youth. Wesley was not in attendance but, before he left the Denver Broncos, for Tennessee, he made a video especially for Denver’s Goodwill. He was a mentor and friend to many. He made an impact on the community and will be greatly missed by young people, Goodwill and football fans.

The Power of Work Luncheon will be remembered throughout the year by those who attended. It was impossible to leave the Marriott City Center without renewed strength and hope for mankind. Dreams came true in 2013 for Colette Rondon, Abdela Tekuye, Winifred Johnson and Michael Williams.

Proceeds from this fundraising event benefit Goodwill’s community programs for at-risk students, struggling adults, and people with disabilities.

Goodwill Industries of Denver seeks to reverse the cycle of poverty for at-risk youth, struggling families and individuals with disabilities. When you shop or donate at Goodwill, you give dignity and hope through education and career development opportunities to more than 19,000 Coloradans in need.

www.goodwilldenver.org